Personal Trainers providing true Personal Training at the First Private Studio in Leawood

Olathe Kansas

Serving Olathe Kansas with a Gym, Private Studio and Certified Personal Trainers

With 23 years of experience, His & Her Fitness is dedicated to serving the Olathe Kansas clients achieve their health goals. We understand that making a life change can be challenging, but we believe that with the right tools and mindset, anyone in Olathe Kansas can create realistic and sustainable healthy habits. We are grateful for clients who are mentally ready to embark on this journey and are committed to supporting them every step of the way. Our gym in Leawood Kansas is a welcoming environment where we meet you where you are and provide the stepping stones for your personalized plan. Thank you for considering joining us and for being an awesome example to others who are just starting their fitness journey.

About Olathe Kansas

Olathe Kansas is the county seat of Johnson County, Kansas, United States. It is the fourth-most populous city in both the Kansas City metropolitan area and the state of Kansas, with a 2020 population of 141,290.

Olathe was founded by John T. Barton in the spring of 1857. He rode to the center of Johnson County, and staked two quarter sections of land as the town site. He later described his ride to friends: "...the prairie was covered with verbena and other wild flowers. I kept thinking the land was beautiful and that I should name the town Beautiful."  Purportedly, Barton asked a Shawnee interpreter how to say "Beautiful" in his native language. The interpreter responded, "Olathe."

Olathe was incorporated in 1857, and while not the first city in Johnson County, its rapid growth led to it being named the county seat in October 1859.

Olathe served as a stop on the Oregon Trail, the California Trail, and the Santa Fe Trail. Catering to travelers was the main source of income for local stores and businesses. The Mahaffie House, a popular resupply point for wagons headed westward, is today a registered historical site maintained by the City of Olathe. The staff wears period costumes, and stagecoach rides and farm animals make the site a favorite among children. Visitors can participate in Civil War re-enactments, Wild West Days, and other activities.

After the construction of the transcontinental railroad, the trails to the west lost importance, and Olathe faded into obscurity and remained a small, sleepy prairie town.

In the 1950s, the construction of the interstate highway system and, more directly, Interstate 35, linked Olathe to nearby Kansas City, Missouri. The result was tremendous residential growth as Olathe became a part of the Kansas City metropolitan area. In the 1980s, Olathe experienced tremendous commercial growth, which also drew more residents. Olathe's population is estimated to have surpassed 100,000 in 2001, and later projections showed Olathe's growth continuing as the city expanded into the farm fields south, west, and north of town.

In 2008, the U.S. Census Bureau ranked Olathe the 24th-fastest growing city in the nation. The same year, CNN and Money ranked Olathe number 11 on its list of the "100 Best Cities to Live in the United States."